Trick Or Treat On Craigslist

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mental recess, monkey pickles

If you want to sell it or buy it,

Craigslist will post it. Up until recently most of the listings were what you would expect on such a site: cars, washers, furniture, sports equipment etc. According to WFAA News in Dallas www.wfaa.com/news/consumer/22236124l.html the newest trend on Craigslist is a bit unusual, but we do live in a free enterprise society where “You want it, I got it. Let’s make a deal” prevails. Women are selling positive pregnancy tests.

I suppose if you found yourself “in the family way”, you might be looking for ways to keep the future little tyke in diapers. Given the procedure for taking such a test, a pregnant mom could continue to supply a steady stream (sorry about that) of positive tests for nine months. The return on your investment is better than buying gold, especially if you are a Texas gal. For some reason, positive pregnancy tests go for around $5 more if from a Texas supplier.

Now the question is

who would want such a thing? I mean you could flash it around, maybe get a few early baby showers out of it, possibly a proposal from a reluctant boyfriend, maybe some extra cash on your Lone Star Card (equilevant to food stamps) but evidentially your secret will be found out.

And how would you market such a thing? “In need of some ‘Positive Reinforcement?’ Get your Clearblue First Response positive test results for the low price of $35.99. But wait, call now and we will give you a second EPT test at no additional cost. Just pay shipping and we will do the handling. If you specify Texas, add an addition $4.99. Call today. Available for a limited time only.”

Since these tests are crossing state lines,

will the Federal Interstate Commerce become involved? Will they require a stamped date of freshness? An expiration date? Is there an expiration date? Will they require the location of the collection site as they do for bottled water?

Is this another frivolous lawsuit in the making? Will the positive results be used as a basis to sue Clearblue for “false/positives” or Craigslist for fall advertising causing emotional suffering, damage, and in some cases heart attacks?

All I can say is “Craig, does your mother know what you are listing?” And for the women supplying these tests, all I can say is you better make hay while the sun shines because in nine months the gravy train will come to a stop.

Oh, and Happy Halloween. Trick or Treat?